Predictions and Channelling

From correspondence:

I was also a bit sad that sufis came to you for channeling, since sufis, if anything, are supposed to be in touch with the best sources and do all channeling themselves.

****

There is no criticism from my part in anything you do, not even accepting money for services. There is a need for exchange of money after a session and in most cases you need it more than your communicators (clients) and if not, I am sure you would reverse the process. For me, because of my special conditions, other systems prevail. I do not try to impose my systems on others.

****

But this our present civilisation (above all) has to learn: you make your future, you don’t “predict” it. By trying to “predict it” you nail your victim to his useless past. You make him RIGID. Our economists (80% of them), doctors, psychiatrists, politicians — all do this terrible disservice. Also the prophesying “mystics”.

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Shamcher in LA, 1980

From Rabbi Ivan (Raqib) Ickovits:

Dear folks:

Interestingly, many years ago, i had the privilege of hosting Shamcher when he came to LA to speak with some folks at a Rand Offshoot in Marina Del Rey. I think it was in early 1980 or 1981. I was a working physicist at that time working either for Jet Prop Labs in Pasadena on a Mars lander, or at Hughes Aircraft in Culver City on some detailed F18 radar or deep space surveillance system. Shamcher stayed with Tajali and myself at our home in Brentwood and i escorted him to his meeting with the project managers at PRI or some other alphabet offshoot from Rand trying to provide them with enough data to make OTEC feasible for a prototype construction amd convince them to allocate Govt research funds to fund a small scale effort. I don’t know how successful he was with this, but the intensity, focus and dedication he threw into the effort was awesome.

Some years later when Tajali and i had one of our private dinners with Pir Vilayat and Mary in Europe, i remember they spoke of Shamcher in hushed tones as the esoteric head of the esoteric school for many
years.

Going where the eagles fly,

Raqib

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CARTER SIGNS OTEC BILL INTO LAW

From the Solar OCEAN ENERGY Liaison

INCORPORATING The OTEC Liaison
VOLUME 4 NUMBER 6
June 1980

CARTER SIGNS OTEC BILL INTO LAW

On July 17th President Carter signed into law the finalized version of the Matsunaga-Fuqua bill. Re-numbered HR 7474, the completed act is a restoration of the original versions initiated by Senator Spark Matsunaga as S 1380 and Representative Fuqua as HR 5796. With Carter’s signature it has now become Public Law Number 96-310. The entire text of the President’s statement regarding the bill appears in this issue. While the passage into law now commits the United States Government to a national goal of 10,000 megawatts from OTEC systems by 1999, as well as providing funding (on a cost-sharing basis) for two OTEC pilot plants, the other “half” of major OTEC legislation is also near completion. The Studds-Inouye bill, initiated by Representative Studds as HR 6154 and Senator
Inouye as S 2492, deals with licensing of OTEC plants and loan guarantees, and as of July 22nd is on President Carter’s desk for signature.

As this issue goes to press, the President has ten days to either sign or veto the bill or, in the absence of his approval, allow it to automatically become law after the 10-day limitation has elapsed. While there is always the possibility of a veto, it is doubtfui, since the Studds-Inouye bill would not affect the budget, and since Senator Inouye heads the Rules Committee at the forthcoming Democratic Convention.

Highlights of the final versions of both bills will be excerpted in the next issue of Ocean Energy.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE JULY 18TH, 1980
OFFICE OF THE WHITE HOUSE PRESS SECRETARY
THE WHITE HOUSE

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT

I HAVE SIGNED HR 7474, THE OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION ACT, A BILL TO ESTABLlSH WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AN ACCELERATED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM TO FOSTER THE EARLY USE OF OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION FACILITIES.

SENATOR MATSUNAGA AND REPRESENTATIVE FUQUA ARE TO BE COMMENDED FOR RECOGNIZING THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION THAT RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES CAN MAKE IN MEETING OUR NATION’S LONGTERM ENERGY NEEDS. THE BILL ESTABLlSHES A LONG-TERM NATIONAL GOAL OF 10,000 MEGAWATTS OF ELECTRICAL CAPACITY, OR ENERGY PRODUCT EOUIVALENT, FROM OTEC SYSTEMS BY THE YEAR 1999. IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE THIS GOAL, AS WELL AS INTERMEDIATE GOALS, AND TO FACILITATE THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDUSTRIAL BASE FOR OTEC TECHNOLOGY, THE BILL AUTHORIZES THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY TO DESIGN, CONSTRUCT AND OPERATE TWO OTEC DEMONSTRATION FACILITIES ON A COST-SHARING BASIS.

IN IMPLEMENTING THE PROVISIONS OF THIS BILL, THE DEPARTMENT WILL CARRY OUT A MEASURED PROGRAM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF OTEC TECHNOLOGY CONSISTENT WITH TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS AND SOUND FISCAL POLlCY. A MAJOR COMMITMENT BY THE PRIVATE SECTOR WILL BE INDISPENSABLE FOR SUCCESSFUL DEVELOPMENT OF OTEC TECHNOLOGY, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WILL SEEK SIGNIFICANT COST SHARING BY THE PRIVATE SECTOR FOR THESE DEMONSTRATION FACILITIES.

SIGNED: JIMMY CARTER

S 2492: PASSED INTO PUBLIC LAW, 8/3/80

PL96–320
(96th Congress; 320th Bill Passed)

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OTEC History

(OTEC means Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion)

Ocean Thermal Difference, the difference between surface and deeper layers, as a source of power, has been recognized for more than a century. In 1881 an American engineer, Campbell, two Italians, Dornig and Boggia and a French physicist, D’Arsonval proposed a closed cycle Ocean Thermal device. The warm surface water would heat and cause evaporation of a “working fluid” (alternative fluids were suggested) which would pass through a turbine, thereafter being condensed by cold water pumped up from deep layers and again fed into the evaporator. The first to build practical plants was a pupil of D’Arsonval, the French engineer George Claude, member of L’Academie des Sciences, of the French Society of Civil Engineers. He won the fiftieth anniversary medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He chose the “open cycle system” in which the ocean surface water itself evaporates and drives the turbine,and rejected the “closed cycle”, of which he said in a talk to American engineers 22 October 1930(1):

“Manifestly, such a solution is burdened by a number of inconveniences, one of them being the extra equipment for and cost of the working fluid and another the necessity of transmitting enormous quantities of heat through the inevitably dirty walls of immense boilers… The sea water itself contains all that is needed for the direct utilization of such small temperature differences.”

Claude ran a small experimental device before fellow-members of l’Academie des Sciences in Paris, then built a larger plant at OUGREE in Belgium, which, in his words, “Made my virulent opponents hold their tongues.” His one-meter diameter turbine generated 60 Kilowatts at 5000 rounds per minute with a total ocean thermal difference of 20°C. This proved the thermodynamic viability. “It remained to be seen how the plant would function in the ocean, how pumping cold water from deeper layers would influence neighboring layers and whether foaming would drastically decrease efficiency or break the turbine.”

Claude moved his Belgian plant to Cuba. A two feet diameter pipeline would have been sufficient to supply his condenser,with the proper amount of water, but would have caused the cold water to be warmed before arriving at the condenser and would have incurred intolerable friction losses. A pipeline of two-meter diameter was built — and lost in a storm. A second pipeline was also lost. A third pipeline was built and successfully laid. The plant ran for eleven days, producing 22 KW on a turbine much too small for the other components of the plant, but Claude was operating on his own money and that of a few friends, and could not afford a new turbine. The basic function was nevertheless proven and, in the opinion of these resourceful enterprisers, should have been followed by prototype and commercial plants.

In 1931 a French Maritime company built a pilot plant for shipboard use at Le Havre, described by H. Brillie in GENIE CIVIL for 21 June 1931 (2). This plant, using ship engine waste water as warm water source and ocean surface water as cold water source produced fresh water with as little as 1-2 parts per million salt and a power expenditure of only a fraction of conventional plants, according to the report. Gossipers claim the plant was killed by people who wanted to sell more fuels to ships.

In 1941 the French Government became involved and in 1942 ENERGIE DES MERS was formed, a semi-official company for researching and building OTEC plants (3,4). In French laboratories and on a chosen site at Abidjan in West Africa research was conducted, for example on the effect on neighboring layers when huge amounts of cold water was removed by pumping. Only the closest layers were found to be involved. Mindful that Claude had lost two pipelines, the manufacturing and laying of the cold water pipeline were carefully planned and carried out. This pipeline was considered the only new and unproven component in the plant and therefore given major attention. The line was left in place for six months for study of corrosion/biofouling. The area between low and high tide was found particularly vulnerable. For current OTEC ships, with the cold water pipeline entirely under water, this would be irrelevant. In laboratories in Dakar and in France proper research was conducted on general evaporator and condenser problems, including air-and-gas removal from sea water under evaporation. An entire plant was designed but never built.

In 1947 and 1948 the undersigned studied the French work, returned to the States and became involved with the University of California and its newly established Sea Water Conversion Laboratory. In 1951 Professor Everett D. Howe, founder and first director of the Sea Water Conversion Laboratory, obtained State funds, later Federal funds, from the “Saline Water Office” that had been established when Dr. James Hofman of the National Bureau of Standards demonstrated in Congress two small thermal machines built in my presence on the pattern of the French.

The University of California built and tested three plants, all open cycle, since the University wanted desalination, primarily. In the open cycle, desalination is achieved with no additional cost. A laboratory plant was built and tested by Dr. Lev Akonjanoff. Its main feature was a two-quarts pyrex glass kettle. This vessel is kept in a stove at constant temperature, to avoid losses by condensation on the glass wall. Tests were made with a) batch distillation with constant temperature and pressure, b) batch distillation with constant temperature and varying pressure, e) flow-distillation with constant temperature and pressure, d) flow-distillation with constant temperature and varying pressure. This laboratory-sized plant was built and tested in the Hesse Hall of the Berkeley Campus. At the Sea Water Conversion Laboratory of the Richmond Field Station was simultaneously built the so-called ‘first low-temperature difference plant’ consistlng of an already available 4.5 foot-long and 30 inches diameter cylindrical evaporator plus condenser, pumps etc. It was scheduled to produce 2,000 gallons desalted water per day and no power. After this plant had been tested for a variety of possible conditions, our ‘second low temperature difference plant’ was designed and built. Funds had now been made available for suitable hardware. This plant was scheduled to produce 10,000 gallons per day desalted water plus as much power as our available General Electric turbine would seem willing to offer. This turbine had been used in an aircraft air conditioning unit. The evaporator had been supplied with three windows and inside lights, so that the flash evaporation procedure could be observed. The sea water was seen to explode in a myriad of drops the moment it entered the evaporator. The prior idea of drip-trays, over which water was supposed to flow in sheet-like formations, was proven invalid. This again may be one reason why our yields often were higher than formulas predicted.

Dr. Akobjanoff(7) and Mr. Beorse (9) conducted independent studies of evaporation rates related to then existing formulae. Yields in the University
plants varied from 2 to 189% of predicted values. Dr. Langmuir, co-author of the Langmuir-Knutsen formula, saw the reason for this in that essential factors had not been included in the formulae, during a discussion with Mr. Beorse in 1955.

Tables, showing yields of desalted water and power produced at the University plants, are available at the University and/or Sea Water Conversion Laboratory. One table, showing cost, estimated or confirmed, of various desalting methods, indicates that desalting cost for a Low Thermal Difference Plant is lower than for all other methods and lower than the then-goal for municipal water (85 dollars versus 125 dollar per acre foot) but higher than the irrigation goal (40 dollars). (5,6,7,8,9)

Commercial Design.

On the basis of this testing of three plants, the University designed a desalting plant for the canyon near La Jolla and the Scripps Oceanographic Institution. It was scheduled to produce five million gallons fresh water per day. A number of large private firms, located in California or with branch offices in California assisted in this design. Particularly helpful was the San Francisco Branch Office of the Westinghouse Corporation.

This plant would have no turbine. The total temperature difference in the winter was 16°F, not enough for power production but enough to desalt water at a lower cost than any then or later developed system, since this small thermal difference provided distillation under vacuum. Additional energy for pumping etc., would come (1955 prices) to 24 cents per 1000 gallons, while fuel-fired plants require from three to four times as much energy. With the addition of maintenance cost, total cost comes to 28 cents per 100 gallons, not including amortization and interest, which changes from site to site. A smaller plant would mean a greater relative cost for the cold water pipeline and for maintenance, so the total cost would be higher. Firm bids were obtained for all components, including two million dollars for manufacturing and laying the cold water pipeline. This one job was upped to three million in our estimate. We tried to be equally conservative for other components. The estimated cost of the entire plant was six million dollars. People not familiar with our research and estimate preferred a one and half billion dollar Feather River project — valid, in a sense, at least, while water supply in Northern California was ample. It isn’t any more. The subject plants may still be built, all over Southern California.

The University of California and Energie des Mers

Following Mr. Beorse’s study at Energie des Mers in France in the late Forties, the General Director of Energie des Mers, Andre Nizery, visited the University of California and gave a seminar at the Berkeley Campus in March 1954 (10). Andre Nizery was also deputy Director of the huge semipublic corporation “Electricite de France” which supplies the French with electricity and other forms of power. Professor Everett D. Howe of the University, along with David Jenkins, then-director of the Saline Water Office of the US Department of the Interior visited Energie des Mers in Paris and Abidjan. Mr. Beorse again visited Energíe des Mers in 1957,1959, 1963 and 1973, this last time on occasion of the passing of M. Christian Beau, who had been General Director of Energie des Mers after Andre Nizery’s death. M. Beau had also been head of France’s public works.

All personnel of Energie des Mers were convinced that they had the obvious solution to the world’s energy problem. Their research had confirmed their brightest hopes. The winds of politics in France favored nuclear energy.

Throughout the years until today the University of California continued specific research on heat transfer, heat exchangers, de-aeration, evaporator characteristics, preventing carry-over of water droplets into the steam flow, scaling, corrosion, biofouling. In June 1957 Professor E.D. Howe reported to ASME (11).

From 1960 Hilbert and James Anderson, a father-son engineering team, took up a serious study of a closed cycle plant and actually built a small sample. In the seventies, with the soaring oil prices, the National Science Foundation took up the matter, asked for studies,, and received voluminous reports, first from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, principal investigator Professor William E. Heronemus, a former Navy Captain who had been in charge of vast shipbuilding efforts. In rapid succession followed the Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics
laboratory, the Carnegie-Mellon University, the Universities of Texas, Hawaii, New Orleans, Florida — and substantial industrial firms: Lockheed, Bechtel, TRW, and of course the Andersons’ Sea Solar Power, Hydronautics, Batelle, Allied Chemical Corporation — thousands upon thousands of pages proosing a multitude of types and all of them emphasizing the immediate readiness of this technology and the wholly benign ecological effects. Cost estimates vary from $700 and up per Kilowatt built and of course the fuel is free. If only two percent of the power available in the Ocean Thermal difference were utilized we would have many times as much energy as the world now needs.

Bryn Beorse, University of California 19 September 1977

(Note: footnotes for this document were not found at this time. However, they will be added later should another version of this be found that includes the footnotes.)

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Marriage

4 April 1980
Dear S.,
Your beautiful spring greeting reached me and embraced me and thrilled me.  Here in California we have spring and winter and summer fifty times a year, up-and-down, in-and-out, blending into each other making everybody crazy, including the skiers who shoosh down from the San Bernardino mountains, change quickly into shorts while negotiating the lower part of the hills, then diving into the pacific at Santa Monica, skis and all, the skkiing [sic] now being water skiiiiiiing.  Isn’t it much better to live in solid, conservative Toronto where a winter is a winter, a spring a spring and a summer a summer – sault?
How is G.?  Summersaulting in the Swiss alps? Or cauterwailing in Toronto?  As a minister said a wedding in Norway “Well, I bless the couple of course, but why had the groom gone all the way to Aalesund, three miles away, when there were so many worthy maidens ready here in Kristiansund, even among his next-door-neighbors?”
Yes or no, aren’t humans strange and fidgety?  Why not indeed?  And when I married, the minister looked furiously at me and barked “How do I know that this marriage will last???” You dummy, thought I, but aloud I said “Oh well, Evelyn is so steadfast and loving so…” Shot back the cleric: “I dinna ask ye to tell me about how ye think Evelyn may be.  What about yarself, ya hoodlum??” To which I answered nothing.  What do I know about this “self?” But it lasted at least until now, 33 years.  Not bad, eh? So was he wrong that minister? His suspicions were wrong, voicing them was wronger.  Not his business.  Even though he was in good faith, but dumb faith.
Love,
Shamcher

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Love and Thank You

28 March 1980
Dear K.,
What exquisite “poetical prose” into which you have hidden — and revealed — your message.  Yes, I see how hard it is but never harder than your courage has agreed to be challenged…When you see a star that another doesn’t see, demand not that he see it too, but forget that star and come down to his station (or up) and give him what he demands — then later again you may bend him….for the sake of the child or children, and, come to think of it, for his sake too, and yours.
I would love-love-love to see you when you come down here, though from June 2-5 I am in Washington DC, June 10-16 in Banff, Canada and I do not know whether I shall be back here between 5 and 10 June.  Please come at a time when I will be here!
Love and thank you and love again,
Shamcher, Bryn (which is worst?)

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Tops

28 March 1980
Dear M.,
I am so glad you went to India for it seems to have opened your eyes. You see the hypocracy or callousness that has dominated a nation on top of material wealth. As Uban says,”The American clergy in the Conference of Religion for peace so dominates the actions that an Indian has no say.” Because Americans have top plumbing, we think we also have top wisdom, top morals, in short: Tops. When, earlier, you wanted to enter the American clergy, I feared you would be too impressed with its concepts. Now, at least, you will know better, whatever you enter.
First-off, it looks to me that you should go back to India and work with General Uban, if he has a plan for you and it is economically feasible. So, write him, tell him your wish and your economic status and ask what he has in mind for you, the economic basis, where you would live and so on. You wrote me you were sick in India. Serious? Or just a fleeting stomach upset because of unaccustomed water — which can be set straight if you go?…..It may be that General Uban badly wants your services. You type well, string out very readable sentences, you are a great botanist, [sic:botanosit], planter, gardener, not to mention nurse, food preparer, and it would be nice finding you there when I arrive. He wanted me there too, whenever he says the time.
Love,
Shamcher

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Invitiation to Visit

26 March 1980
Dear A.,
Would you and N. come south to San Francisco and see all of us?  I don’t mean that her identity should be made known — except of course as she may want.  Just the pleasure of seeing you and her.  Unfortunately I don’t have a big house where you could have sparate rooms and bath room.  I live in a small apartment as usual but there are plenty of sufi houses where you-both would be very welcome, or you could stay in one of our palatial hotels.  I will be going to Florida to see what progress in OTEC plants at Key West some time in April, to Washington DC June 2-5 and to Banff in Canada June 10-16-20, otherwise free until August I think or firmly believe.  Hidayat was just here, very interesting, inspiring and crazy (with made and cancelled appointments).
Love,
Shamcher
[small map drawn of area where he lives]

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Thank You Deeply for Tape

14 March 1980
Dear ___,
Thank you deeply for tape.  I played it to a gathering of friends and some rose to sublime heights of enjoyment and thrill and some suffered hysterics and commanded me to stop before I had finished.  Why?  What magic is involved?  Personally I cannot understand the pain and resistance that some felt.  Can you?  I felt nothing offensive, much of deep beauty.  I was particularly attracted to the unique interdependence of the accompaniment with the singing — and this was exactly what frightened or repelled the furious critics.  They said the accompaniment did not suit and was not harmonius with the singing and I thought that was just what it was — ingeniously, unconventionally suitable and harmonic.  I may add that those who criticised and who thought there was not harmony were people of great tradition in what we call classical music — Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, Greig, Debussy, and that finnish composer — what’s his name again?  I would love to have your comment on this strange tale I have here reported.
I am sorry I cannot now respond with some more substantial remuneration for your noble effort.  You may send a tape to my friend [name and address] and tell her a tear-dripping story about all the hard work and deep sacrifice you had preparing this special tape exclusively for her at the request of Shamcher, so that she may know how to remunerate you (I know her well and she has some cabbage).  (But she is careful with her expenses and has to have appealing words to part with some).  Maybe she will also be interested in your whole project.  Who knows?  She doesn’t speak much French, if any.  But she has a world interest.
To you, all the little bit of love this universe has allowed me to contain and spend, love love love
Shamcher or Bryn or, really nothing 000 or agent X-5

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Life and/or Death

14 March 1980
Dear ____,
On a gloomy threateningly cloudy day your “clear crystal” words lifted me up above the clouds to where light always shines .. yes yes, true, life and death belong together.  If you deny one, you deny the other.  Like twin sisters, you accept both or none.  I love you,  ___, with the passion of sun, moon the stars (planets or otherwise ) and .. passion-love, life and/or death…
Shamcher, Bryn, whatever

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