Tag Archives: Meditations

Space Has All the Qualities You Need

Space has all the qualities, all the treasures you need. Figure the sweet life of space (which is yourself) rush from the farthest end of space toward and through the length of your body, from toes to head and then off again to the farthest end of space in the other direction. This a line or slender body. Then repeat, then have you whole body shrink to just a point, stay there awhile and then expand to the entire reach of the universe in all directions. You are a mighty ball, beyond all dimensions. Contract again. You will have absorbed all the powers and wisdom and grace of the universe. Many details of knowledge will still escape you, but that does not matter any longer. You are free — and noble. Our so-called civilization imagines that we know or ought to know, and should run to some “teacher” who is supposed to know if we don’t. All wrong. Wisdom (not knowledge) is pressing in from all sides and we ignore it seeking fabled, non-existing “knowledge” from imagined (dangerous) teachers.

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Meditation, Drugs

From correspondence:

But what is meditation? Not just thinking, in fact the opposite. Swami Rama points out two ways of meditation: voiding the mind of all appetites, for food, for sex, for fame, for riches, for achievements. Or concentrating on one point – a star, a guru. He greatly prefers the first. The modern way of concentrating upon a guru may create all kinds of difficulties. It is still a form of appetite. But the guru’s physical form is not the real guru, but rather his spirit, or rather than that again, your own spirit, inspired by the guru, whether he deserves it or not.
This also answers your question about the thumb up transmission of physical force. For people living on that level it becomes important. Also, it may prevent them from advancing further. But it is not necessary that it so prevents a being, if that being can free himself from it later. In a sense it is like drugs. A person may be on a stage where he would never have had a lift except first by drugs, but drugs also prevent him from going on. Except if one day he can free himself entirely from the delusion of drugs. As to such transfers of physical force – to an enlightened being it is no help at all, just a cause for an indulgent smile. To a physically drowned person it may be temporarily good. Again, it may later prevent him from going on.

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Direct Communication

From correspondence:

All titles or hierarchies expressed in this world, while pretending to be functions, are not true functions but dilettantic games. You have a very good mind. Why do you still worry about these things?

Now as to direct communication: That happens in a world for which the language we use, such as English, French, or Arab or Russian — has no words. Therefore any explanation would be entirely faulty. I knew, not always but often, people’s feelings or thoughts when I was a child. I could communicate directly with Inayat Khan at age 26-29 but not with others at that time. By simple meditations I gradually regained lost talents — though not until I was in the seventies. Patient meditation did it. Often you write to me about your feelings and views that I already know. But it seems to me you are more angry with me than you express in your gracious letters. Your ideas on this would be appreciated.

Can I teach you to thus communicate? No, and I believe nobody can. But I can tell you how I achieved a half-way ability and you might try the same: Meditation at definite hours each day. For example from 4:20 a.m. on in the morning. That suits me. And the breathing I taught you before that, in fresh air. Now, what kind of meditation? For you I would think: No object: no person, no picture but simply void your mind of appetites — for food, sex, possessions, progress, money, wealth, fame. In the emptiness a third part of yourself peeps forth: Intuition. After many or few years. After months or centuries. That is all I can say.

There are psychics. They are called, in my book, distorted. They tell you they can predict events with 80% accuracy. Phooey on them. God has not even decided on those issues and they try to rob God of his options. So many astrologers do the same. You may call the psychic talents “gifts”. Mostly they are gifts produced by a misdirected urge, another appetite. An appetite for being different, able to do what most others cannot do. Not bad in itself, perhaps, but bad when predicting happenings — instead of creating those happenings by our actions. Not merely mystics but doctors, economists, senators play the stupid game of forecasts. Forecasts become excuses for inaction. They are based on past follies rather than the future we should create. In that sense psychics are undesirable. You may reach a stage where you see patterns, but you know or should know that these patterns may not necessarily occur. You try to change what ought to be changed, rather than advertising your wonderful sixth or fourteenth sense.

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Direct Response

Whenever I say the morning prayer (Through the rays of the sun, through the waves of the air…) sweet energy flows through my veins, nerves, a direct response from whatever some call God. Why should he uglify life by replying in rigid words? What are words anyway? Words are your own creation and may be inspired from God but are not his words. We live by and with structures. Everybody constructs rigid concepts. They want “GOD” to come down and be embedded in some of these stupid concepts. So he does not even burp. It is not a matter of “faith”. What is faith? Often stupid structures. People listen to a preacher then go home to try out his willy-nilly theories. Can you live without words? Nor reading or writing? Not even knowing how perhaps? I have met people who could neither read nor write, in any language, yet knew God. Can you not know him if you can read or write? Of course, though not through that reading or writing. That would be unfair, to illiterates at least. “True wisdom is not found in any book” say the Chinese — then flood us with books, about I Chi, Acupuncture, Buddhism, Confucious, Lao Tze.

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Truth

From the newsletter, Sufis Speak

The age old search for truth has so far been out-shouted and often  drowned by the more aggressive demand for obedience, conformity, to established creeds or concepts. The Sufi Order and its church-like organ, the Universal Worship, claim TRUTH as its goal and substance — not a “truth” that someone is going to tell you about, but the truth that each one can seek and find, honestly. This, claims the Sufi, is the right and duty of this present age, as contrasted to earlier periods where the majority of humanity did not and could not have such a demanding goal. Various virtues, such as purity, loyalty, compassion, were stressed, and these virtues were good and proper but failed to fully develop under the reign of dishonesty that prevailed.

A devoted people, portrayed in the Sunday funnies, believed a “sacred tree” contained manuscripts and treasures proving the greatness of their people. The King, goaded by his curious woman, chops down the tree and finds it empty. The King has broken the spirit of the people and must die.

Upon exactly such illusions have we lived. We talk about HISTORY. What is history? Concepts of historians, shared by the believers. One day we may discover what, if anything, was ‘true’ of the traditions. This effort is already being made, but we are happy to jump to conclusions long before there are any. Our most wi de-spread national magazine recently wrote, referring to the Dead Sea Scrolls, “Luckily, these documents do not rock our Faith”. Would it have been bad if the documents had revealed that we had been wrong and would have to change our faith, in the light of truth? Actually, they did. And some are changing their “faith” for the better.

The light of truth shines, not only upon religion, or politics, or science, but upon the simple relationship between two or more humans or between man and animal or man and plant. All day long you meet people who tell you with all firmness that friend Bill or Mary are stubborn, stingy, unreasonable, forgetting altogether that they know nothing, absolutely nothing, about Bill or Mary, except that they are living expressions of the eternal Creator and just now expressing exactly what that living Creator wants them to express at just this moment. They will change tomorrow and even in the next second.

One sufi, Inayat Khan said, “Whatever any man or woman does or says to me, I see it as God doing or saying, and whatever I say or do to them, I know I do or say it to God.”

In such a concept there is no room for judgment. A sufi does not judge. Or I must correct myself: Some who call themselves Sufis do judge. Recently a man who called himself a Sufi tore up a robe he was wearing in the service of a Universal Worship, flung it on the altar in a furious resentment over what another, who called himself a sufi, had done. This other sufi had not killed anyone, had not called names. He had loved. Some would say loved too much or loved the wrong one. What made them think they knew, and could judge another man or woman? What do we know of love, even “our own” love?

We know this much, that in the organization of any present state, or nation, there is a frightening starvation of the creative force of love. Young men and women kill themselves daily and hourly to fit into the traditional  patterns. Their longing to serve and build the nation into which they were born is frustrated by a thousand bonds and rules. Their longing to create, in turn, new generations are slapped down, by pills, regulations and abortions, instituted by people who have not even tried to see and observe the pulsation of LIFE seeking always new expression.

Some have managed to emancipate themselves to some measure from the choking influence of established traditions. For example, in communities that are more or less self-sustaining, with their own economics, supply, income, outlay, the members can choose their own l life form. In many such communities there are no pills, no abortions, LIFE is honored, tended, loved, cared for and developed in harmony. Why, say some critics, what about the population explosion?

Another sorry superstition. There are areas in the world where sober limitation of life expressions would be an advantage in cooperation with other, more important efforts. Here in the United States there are vast wastelands that could be cultivated, and inhabited. Our problem is not overpopulation but under-achievement. One prominent food resources scientist, presidential advisor Karl Brandt even goes as far as saying, “Wish I could write a book, this underpopulated world of ours. Many underdeveloped countries need more, not less people to develop a proper agriculture as basis for industry…”

What is lacking is feel for the entire dynamic humanity. Those who have that feel know a thousand ways to feed and house and care for those living now and those who would come, but stilted, twisted theories firmly holding both learned and unlearned minds in captivity prevent the seers from being heard.

The sufis, or some sufis, are not alone in seeking truth. The yogis, nearest cousins to the sufis, have tried through generations. For fifty years, at least, yogis have crisscrossed the United States but the basic concept of truth was so foreign to the majority here that all they got out of the term Yoga was some exercises and what they called, but do not grasp, “transcendental meditation”. The purpose of all the exercises and all the meditations was to foster that concept of truth that permits suspension of judgment, that permits another man or woman to act his, her way without criticism, judgment, demands.

For each single individual is a precious and quite unique creature and messenger from the Creator, who longs for us to realize this.

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Meditation

From the newsletter, Sufis Speak

“Meditation is just thinking isn’t it? So why the long word?” This is a frequent remark. Meditation is a certain type of thinking. And this is just the beginning.

When you read a book, or skip through it, or when you listen to a lecture, this is not meditation. When you take out of a book or a lecture a thought or two, play with them in your mind, turn them around, look at them from all sides and try to build them into your mind as part of your mind, that is meditation. If you are planning a building or a trip, and particularly if you are not writing things down, but keep the entire picture in your mind while you work on it, that is meditation. When you repeat a well-known prayer without much thought, that is not meditation. Feeling is always a principal part of effective meditation. Actually there is no thought without feeling behind it. There is no life without feeling behind it, and no meditation.

A typical example is the morning prayer some people use. Addressing the Creative Force field that creates and maintains the world, you pray, “Through the rays of the sun, through the waves of the air, through the all-pervading life in space — purify and revivify me…” If, while saying this, you ,just see  a moderately warm ball the size of the sun as you see it from here, you really don’t “meditate”. But if your own creative force rushes into the center of the sun and helps create a huge flaming body, so hot it nearly burns you (though in the non-physical force field heat does not really burn you, but your vivid imagination, sustained by physical experience may make you feel slightly burned) — then you know you are meditating and so effectively that may stretch your consciousness beyond what we have usually called mind. Another sign is that if you meditate on or deeply think about a person who interests you, you may suddenly discover in your mind a concept of this person entirely different from what you have had. What is this? It may be the concept that person has of himself. You may have entered his mind. And it is at first a deflating experience for it shows you what a fool you have been before, thinking that what you thought or felt was reality, and the only one.

This concept that a person has of himself. and which you may share, through meditation, is still. not all there is. Behind and in a sense inside that person is a force field that science is rediscovering today, a non-physical and autonomous system that created and now maintains him, and through meditation you may even be able to reach some of that and be very helpful to your friend, though it is doubtful he will at first accept your “help” and you better be careful and try and test again and again before you maybe relatively sure you have a good thing.

Eventually, through meditation, you may be able to transcend what we have so far termed “mind” and this is the meaning of “transcendental meditation”. Today science realizes that there is a “non-physical” force field, but this non-physical reality is again divided into numberless stages of fineness. It isn’t really a matter of physical or non-physical. All of life is a vast system of force fields of finer and finer structure. “Non-physical” simply means that most people cannot observe this part of the system with their eyes or physical instruments. However, more and more electronic instruments can observe more and more “non-physical” systems. Through meditation some have penetrated deeper into these worlds than any instrument so far devised.

Meditation may develop to be not only cognitive but creative. What is at first imagination may be turned into reality or into non-physical or even physical systems. Was this the way the whole world was once created and is being maintained? Find out!  Practice meditation until you know!

Meditation ought to be the very foundation of education, rather than the present copying of past follies. The ancient Yoga schools feel that this education should start at age 8 to have a chance of success. The perhaps equally ancient sufis claim you should start before you are born. Future civilizations may do so, with results we can hardly imagine. Meanwhile you may begin any time and, and if persistent, go far.

Harvard, MIT, Yale and our huge mega-universities in New York and California, the Humanistic Psychiatrists and other large organizations are today investigating deeply the methods, problems and possible results of meditation, or mind-heart training. This does not exclude individual efforts. On the contrary, the latter may be as important or more important. A few individuals have gone far beyond the institutional methods and results so far offered and all the latter are really due to outstanding individual performances that have been registered and catalogued by the large institutions. If a person prefers to go along this path without any institutional contact he is in good company and should proceed.

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Secret Practices

From correspondence:

You read a saying on secrecy by Inayat Khan.  There is another saying of secrecy in the Vadan where he says that one need never worry, because that which is not meant for a certain person that person will not perceive.  Inayat initiated me in a railway compartment full of people and gave me the Zikar and other “highly secret” practices.

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