Tag Archives: OTEC

Every Willing Hand: Community, Economy and Employment

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Shamcher’s book, Every Willing Hand, is now released and available at amazon!  Find it at  http://every-willing-hand.shamcher.com

Authored by Shamcher Bryn Beorse
Introduction by Carol Sill 

Through Every Willing Hand we glimpse an extraordinary worldview, a simultaneous multiverse of intimate interconnection. A contemporary mystic, Shamcher Beorse views this vast scene through a lens of economics and full employment.

He reveals artfully interwoven themes that all work together to show a complex picture of the forces and influences at play, including visualization, intuition and meditation. Shamcher had great compassion for those who are “half awake in the body of humanity,” and he worked tirelessly to expand horizons for all individuals and communities. 

In one glance the book reflects innumerable facets of our social communities and individual aspirations, all in the context of the need for social reform. Where does he suggest this reform comes from? Not from a revolution in the streets to restore or establish fair and equal opportunity, but from an implemented program ensuring full employment for all who want it.

ISBN/EAN13:0978348540 / 9780978348540
Page Count:168
Binding Type:US Trade Paper
Trim Size:6″ x 9″
Color:Black and White

 

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To SAM: Sufis, OTEC

12 October 1963

My dear Sam,

Your welcome letter came just as I was trying to find where Evelyn had hidden your former letter with your address. I was going to write you that your great success and following will be with other intellectuals than those with whom you now have battle, though the battle serves the purpose of attracting attention. I see from your letter that you received my message through the air as sufis should. Apart from that you have other messages for me which you have not written.

In some respects you are the greatest living sufi (and in other respects l am) but just for that reason it seems, as you say, unwise to adorn yourself with a title such as murshid, here in America, for it will repel more than it attracts. A few will see in you more than that and the more the less ostentatious you are — yet, in a society such as ours a certain ostentation is required to have working chance.

While I had lengthy correspondence with Indian government, now Portugal seems to become the first to try out Some of my special sea water conversion methods — and what irony! India will come to learn at the feet of Portuguese! Not directly and knowingly perhaps, but actually, technically. But is just a small part of my life as horticulture is with you.

Back to titles again: I agree with Vilayat when he does not call himself nor wishes any one else to call himself even Murshid, far less Pir-O-Murshid — in reverence to great Inayat Khan. When Ali Khan called himself Pir-O-Murshid that was between God and himself, and not my concern but I deeply prefer Vilayat’s words, although in some respects Vilayat is greater than his father or, should I say, more appropriate for delivering the message in the Western World — all of which was according to Inayat’s wishes.

Do not worry about how the established sufis will receive you or us. They have no duty to receive anybody nor do we have any duty or wish to be received. We live among us and act and take what reaction comes and often I have felt new and hitherto unheard of souls will carry the burden onwards. Even at an early stage many old sufis who had considered lnayat their personal pet, left in disgust when there was talk of a world message and a world teaching. Others left when Maheboob and Ali took over — for Vilayat (which was even better, the free and large side of the sufi movement) or for private practice as Van Tuyll, or for no more sufis at all.

I am going to Cleveland 25th, then on to New York. Tell me all about these centers. In New York I do not know a single remaining sufi any more. Are there any?

Shamcher

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To SAM: OTEC, and Vilayat

May 1963 (?)

My dear Sam,

Thank you for letter. Salt water conversion in desert interiors have not yet been solved satisfactorily — meaning not cheap enough. Even at the Sea Coast feasibility depends on certain natural conditions — temperature difference between surface and deep water — and slope of bottom.

It is a sad reflection on the human race that, rather than undertaking these simple measurements to determine whether in each case cheap water can be had from the sea –we go into expensive and temporary projects.

I have written to Vilayat about your great spiritual knowledge and achievements and commented upon your built-in defence against over-popularity, thus against waste of time receiving delegations and fans. You appear egotistical or superficial — and a worthy percentage stays away. You don’tcare. Those who go by the book will then not bother you.
Very nice.

How sad about Aramdarya,

Shamcher

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To SAM: OTEC and Middle East, 2

21 November 1958

My dear Sam:

Yes, indeed, it’s about time Nasser had some expert advice on water. However, it may be the only place in the Middle East where specifically the thermal difference will be a cinch is at the Dead Sea. This is bordered jointly by Israel and — is it Jordan? Is any of the Dead Sea on Nasser’s property? If so we can do business. But anyway, there should be grand survey of his whole area in regard to water. So let’s get in touch with Dr. Schawarbi or whoever may be the best link. Though as the world’ s leading expert on certain types of sea water conversion I could command the highest fees, I would have no such thought with Nasser but would go just on expenses paid and so that the family can live in their modest way — either going along (best) or staying here. But it shouldn’t wait much longer.

Whoever he now has as advisers, of whatever nation, there is none who can advise him so accurately on these matters, except professor Howe, Mr. Beau of France or myself.

You should perhaps write Nasser directly, in addition to whatever his envoys may accomplish with us.

Israel has not, as you think, a good method for sea water conversion but a certain Zarkin, a sincere but impractical fanatic, has inveigled them to try a freezing process. On the other hand, Mr. Beau has talked to them about a Dead Sea plant on thermal difference principle which would be excellent if they accept.

Very interesting to hear about your writings and experiences. Prevail upon Peter to go start build the temple.

Family greets you fondly

Shamcher

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To SAM: OTEC and Middle East

1 Aug 58

Dear Sam (but I ought to have noted your sufi name including Mullah, the enlightened one)

It was delightful to read you again (as the French say) and hear of your continued interest in water. Yes, you are so right, while the foreigner’s interest in the Middle East (most Europeans and to some extent Americans) is oil, their own interest is water and also simple plain friendship as a former school teacher in Iraq said here. But we often act as the raw recruit who asked an oncoming person three times quickly “Friend or foe” and then shot, not waiting even for an answer.

Of course, a wise man never asks are you friend or foe but he makes friends, even of the foes, and in the waiting time, before they know they are friends he forgives and sees the future must, “for they know not what they do.”

The specific approach to sea water conversion I am concerned with (and which is the only cheap way so far) is only applicable under certain natural conditions including: Tropical enough to have 15-20 centigrade temp. diff between surface and 500-1000 meter depth and steep enough bottom slope to reach depth required not more than five miles from shore. Pakistan would most probably meet these requirements. But though after our meetings with Pak. officials in SF I made the whole Pakistan embassy in Paris meet my French friends in Paris last year, and though the commercial attaché at the embassy was both enthused and insistent on alerting his government — no measurements to make this point sure has as yet been made.

As to Egypt most coast lines have very faint slope so I am suspicious the method may not apply there but again, no measurement has been made to make sure. But for this reason the Aswan dam may be right for Egypt and I believe we should have helped finance it in spite of all. We are running around guessing who are our friends instead of making them so — making not meaning simply giving or financing dams of course, but above all feeling and knowing that they are friends, actual or potential.

When you wrote I had been thinking about you for a long time, thinking whether to write you and ask whether you would come here help establish or rather expand the sufi cause which has gone slowly, but I thought that perhaps SF was more important and your natural hunting ground. Have you caused Peter to establish and run a center yet? He has all the necessary qualities including stamina, silence and punctuality. SF is a natural center, nationally unique. Seattle is a much tougher spot, with loads of unsound spiritualism, racial bigotry — therefore sufism much needed but also in difficulty finding suitable people and getting a hearing and a setting. Please marry the Karachi fiancé and get things going.

Apropos Peter: We have sent him letters and things, no reply, so I thought he had gone to Paris or perhaps we know not right address? Please contact for us. All here greets you warmly

Shamcher

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OTEC

Very late in my life, in 48 when I was 52 years old… I had chosen engineering before I knew Inayat Khan. In fact, I didn’t know what I wanted to study. My father asked me and I said, “Well, something in the line of physics, medicine, geology, jusrisprudence, the whole lot.” And finally I had to concentrate on one thing so I took engineering because then you can travel and see things in various countries, and I wanted to travel, I wanted to see if the world was round. So one time I when I was the managing director of a small company, and I was in Paris I saw in the National Science Foundation of France a story about energy from the ocean. There were tides, waves, but especially the temperature difference between surface water and deep water. You put in a steam engine there. The warm water of the surface near the tropics evaporates, boils in a boiler, when you lower the pressure, when you pump air out. That steam that develops from this boiling runs a turbine, the turbine runs a generator. And after the turbine, the steam is condensed and this steam apart from being condensed is then fresh water. So you do two things with this machine: you produce energy and water. In California we had a great water shortage at that time. We still have but we have forgotten that, now we have a power shortage. Our power and water government agencies cannot cooperate, they have nothing to do with each other. That is one reason why it is so difficult to promote OTEC. Anyway, I dropped everything else when I found out about this, I said to myself, “This is what the world needs. This is what California needs, the United States, Canada, the world.”

(From a talk given in the late ’70s)

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OTEC Power Point

As today is Earth Day, I created this little slide presentation to introduce some of the ideas around OTEC, that Shamcher had worked so diligently on for decades.

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