Tag Archives: Shamcher

Letters: Shamcher Beorse and Carol Sill, 1974-1977

Now released!

This book of letters reveals an intimate and unique relationship between a teacher and pupil on the Sufi path.

A contemporary western mystic, Shamcher Beorse had been a pupil of the great Sufi, Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan in the 1920’s. Carol Sill was a young beginner on the spiritual path, grieving the sudden death of her only son. Fly along as Shamcher intuitively guides her through the winding routes of Love’s progress, growth and development.

With Shamcher by her side she opened to a world that had been previously closed to her. Share her discoveries as a dazzled and astonished neophyte, learning how to live without her body, and to proceed beyond eyes, ears and even beyond mind.

This process of inner development is all documented here – in real time, through the original correspondence, for Shamcher mailed all Carol’s letters back to her, with copies of his own, asking her to publish them.

Read this book as it was written: as an unfolding correspondence of the soul.

Find out more at the website for the book, or see it on Amazon. Also available on Kindle.

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Filed under 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, Inayat Khan, Letters Book, Shamcher, Sufi

Teachers, Successors

From various correspondence:

You opened your eyes and let me look into your mind and beyond to your heart and soul.  A “thank you” is too feeble to express my feeling.  Didn’t you give me glimpse of The ONLY BEING?

And “manners” – are signs of the heart.

Please forgive me when, like that sufi in one of Idries Shah’s stories, I tell some people what they want to hear, because, as this sufi explained, “I am not his teacher, so I just support his belief in his own way, which is all he can take.”

In the West, discipleship are not and cannot be exactly as in the East.  Pir-O-Murshid learned this gradually, painfully, but at last perfectly.   There will always be different degrees of discipleship, not merely “mureeds and true mureeds” but a million finely distinguishable degrees.

No “successor” is a copy of the predecessor.

You have no slightest obligation to admire or approve what one pir thinks or does, not, for that matter do you need to criticise him, but, like me, you see the flame from within your own heart and so you can storm ahead and work and suffer all kinds of people, the devoted pir–worshippers , the equally devoted God–worshippers who see no “pir”.

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Filed under 1975-1980, Inayat Khan, Shamcher, Sufi

Two Handwritten Letters to SAM

Letter to SAM 1

Letter to SAM 2

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Filed under 1960's, Inayat Khan, Sam Lewis, Shamcher, Sufi

To SAM: “We are all black bags.”

15 March 1967

My dear Sufi Achmed Murad Chisty Cheleby Samuel Lewis & Brother,

Among many other things, our communication of March 13 indicates you are willing to sacrifice yourself into serving the sufi movement in collaboration with Vilayat and the most humble and brutally proud undersigned and in this line any and all posts of confidence are open to you at your choice. The head of the Brotherhood? It is yours. The head of any other activity? It is yours. It is I who determine those things. Have I ever given the impression of not fully acknowledging and appreciating you? If so tell me when and where so that I may repent and strew ashes over my dinner jacket. (I have no dinner jacket but my suit may do.)

I was catapulted into my incongruous position without my knowledge and now has this enormous power which, also, I shall surrender to you if Vilayat so chooseth. Actually I was appointed by Allah, God, the Unfathomable at the age of 8 to revolutionize the religious temper of the world and I hoped to do it on my own terms, that is, God’s terms. I have temporarily lent a hand to the sufis because they are less errant than many other groups. They are not perfect, not one of them, not the greatest or smallest of their masters and I proposed to Hazrat Inayat we might drop the Sufi name. And one day, if no accident interferes, I shall again cut loose and set the world aflame. Posterity will dig up my past and all influences and say I was this and a that. Actually only God exists. The man in a black bag who attended the student meetings in Corvallis, Oregon had the right idea. The black robes of the Universal Worship is basically the same idea. We are all black bags, if we only knew. Therefore I am not as moved as I should be by all your negative experiences. What do you expect? What did friend Jesus expect? to be tortured to death. Well, he actually survived and was brought to India by yogis. He took in the entire yoga lore in addition to, previously, the sufi lore. Now he is a good teacher to those who tune in.
Love
Shamcher

[Written under a Sufi Movement letterhead.]

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Filed under 1960-1970, 1967, Inayat Khan, Sam Lewis, Shamcher, Sufi

To SAM: “I am the youngest..”

12-5-67
My Dear Sufi Ahmed Chisty Samuel L. Lewis,

This just to thank you so much for sending me Sangithas and other documents. Some of the Sangithas confirmed what I already wrote to Headquarters after Musharaff Khan’s passing, which opens up new vistas for either good or worse Haag administration and liaison with sufis (Inayat’s disciples).

You are so absolutely right in pointing to God, Allah, Brahm, Ishwara, Dieu, Gott — rather than persons. Of course, not all are yet at that stage, but even so, it should be kept in mind, and heart, even at the initial stages and besides, all are really on all stages all the time though with a different emphasis. It is also quite true that “families” are unfortunately made to intrude between God and man but some, within these families show so much promise that you hide their faults even to your own sight because you see their great potentialities, and you foster them by stressing them instead of the temporary faults. Others, within same families, are so far astray that you don’t care to foster anything, you rather try to keep them off your mind.

Rumi, that great poet and mystic, quite often fell to unnecessary criticism and wailing over the state of the world and most prophets did. We, at this unique age, could rise above that and thus come even closer to GOD and Allah and dance around in this splendid atmosphere until we, also, become outlived as useful and give room for others. the young, as you say, which of course does not mean young in earthly years but in spirit, outlook. I am the youngest, almost too young. You come next.

Bless and blessings,

Shamcher

What you say about Idries Shah is interesting and true. I am greatly freshened by his keen outlook. He borders on the mystic but still has enough fire of the mind to be most interesting and slightly less mystical. Like all men he is true and a bit false, great and a bit small. Even most sufis are, except perhaps El Ghazali and, to some extent, Inayat Khan. They seem close to perfection. But even in the Sangithas traces of imperfection sneak in.
(No, the Cleveland mureeds did not evade Vilayat. They had not been told about him coming there, were most surprised and desperate hearing him over the TV, asked him a thousand questions by phone in order to identify him. Perhaps there was a mixup. He might have thought they knew.)

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Filed under 1960-1970, 1967, Inayat Khan, Sam Lewis, Shamcher, Sufi

To SAM: fana-fi?

19 October 1965
My dear, dear Sufi Ahmed Murad

Evelyn always reads your letters and mostly enjoys them very much except your last two letters to me and one letter directly to her which seemed to be in answer to some letter I guess she must have written to you. You know her.

Now,, why were these three letters unenjoyable to her? Because, like Moses and Jesus and most pirs and Rumi and others, once in a while you forget God are yourself. And I was the reason this last time. My slip of word that Vilayat “alone” represented his father’s group was not meant in regard to the mass of pupils and especially not in regard to you. It was simply that as titular head he was chosen and anointed by his father (not as channel to us others. He is great by never claiming such channelship). Simply in the humble manner of organiser. In the same vein, Ali Khan and later rather innocently Musharaff Khan, usurped this position.

This does not mean that you may not be further advanced, at least in certain respects, but nobody in the whole world is going to know that except God and all wise men will leave this knowledge to God and not speak it, but to whoever it be revealed, it is revealed and that is more than sufficient.

The other thing that irked you was that, in order to counter your demand that any one being taught by you must have the traditional sufi attitude of a pupil to a master a la fanafisheik or at least fanafi rassoul, I had to humbly (no really I am not humble at all, see later) tell you it was really physiologically impossible for me (as for so many others) to take any other stand than Fana-fi-Alla or Fana-fi Lillah, which is not (all sufi lore to the contrary notwithstanding) a gradual and natural development entitling you to titles, but simply a matter of temperament. And one of the things I always say is that the scientist type, who can never adopt a fana-fi sheik or even a fanafi-rassoul attitude is not therefore excluded from Sufism or any other line of training, and the Fana-fi-Allah or Fana fi-Lillah stage is not at all a sign of Pir-o-Murshidship as you say, though of course a Pir-O-Murshid also is on that stage, but for a Murshid his teaching urge in the special sufi lore is the first condition, then a lot more….Also, dear Sam, never say a person is “not a Sufi”. Every person really is, and Hal and Makam are terms that, as you know changes not merely with different sufi schools, but for the same person as he grows or diminishes, and they are unsuitable for public use. But for me sufism is not so central as for you. You are a great specialist. I am an absolutely nothing, disappearing behind the mask of God, know nothing nothing at all, and as such have a great demand on me that should not be disturbed. I have no respect whatever for the world etc. I was with Temple of Understanding for so many years. Vilayat and I are both ashamed of not having achieved what it has.

Love
Shamcher

(I asked for Shamshuddin’s address, not Major Sadiq’s.)
(Maheboob Khan was indirectly appointed by Hazrat Inayat to rein(sic) for Vilayat until Vilayat would be of age. Nobody accepted Rabia Martin.)
(Abu Bakr Cheleby, 21st descendant from RUMI and head of the Mevlevis, whirling dervishes, is head and organiser but certainly not the most enlightened man of his order. Vilayat is far more than that for his order, but not, either, necessarily the most enlightened. The great thing with Vilayat is that he does not claim to be, in fact claims nothing.)

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Filed under 1960-1970, 1961 - 1965, Inayat Khan, Sam Lewis, Shamcher, Sufi

OTEC

Very late in my life, in 48 when I was 52 years old… I had chosen engineering before I knew Inayat Khan. In fact, I didn’t know what I wanted to study. My father asked me and I said, “Well, something in the line of physics, medicine, geology, jusrisprudence, the whole lot.” And finally I had to concentrate on one thing so I took engineering because then you can travel and see things in various countries, and I wanted to travel, I wanted to see if the world was round. So one time I when I was the managing director of a small company, and I was in Paris I saw in the National Science Foundation of France a story about energy from the ocean. There were tides, waves, but especially the temperature difference between surface water and deep water. You put in a steam engine there. The warm water of the surface near the tropics evaporates, boils in a boiler, when you lower the pressure, when you pump air out. That steam that develops from this boiling runs a turbine, the turbine runs a generator. And after the turbine, the steam is condensed and this steam apart from being condensed is then fresh water. So you do two things with this machine: you produce energy and water. In California we had a great water shortage at that time. We still have but we have forgotten that, now we have a power shortage. Our power and water government agencies cannot cooperate, they have nothing to do with each other. That is one reason why it is so difficult to promote OTEC. Anyway, I dropped everything else when I found out about this, I said to myself, “This is what the world needs. This is what California needs, the United States, Canada, the world.”

(From a talk given in the late ’70s)

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Filed under Energy, Inayat Khan, OTEC, Shamcher